Join AGRICURB on the 13th March for ‘From domestication to Domesday: Celebrating recent archaeological research on early farming funded by the European Research Council’

‘From domestication to Domesday: Celebrating recent archaeological research on early farming funded by the European Research Council’

An evening of talks, refreshments and ‘agricultural tours’ through the Pitt Rivers Museum, March 13th, 5-7:30 pm

How did farming emerge in prehistory, and what impact did it have on people, plants, animals and landscapes? Recent research in the School of Archaeology has tackled these questions and revealed new and surprising answers. Our work has ranged from the domestication of the dog by late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers to the establishment of cultivation and herding in diverse settings from the Middle East to western Europe, and the first ‘enclosure movement’ in Britain — the emergence of Bronze Age field systems. Funded by the European Research Council, which celebrates its 10th anniversary in the week of March 13-17, 2017, this research has fresh implications for how we think about farming today and plan for future food security.

Brief informal talks by three ERC project grant holders in the School of Archaeology at Oxford — Greger Larson, Amy Bogaard and Chris Gosden — will be followed by wine, canapes and small group tours through the Museum Court displays, highlighting some of the collection’s lesser known objects and stories relating to farming from all over the world.